Michael Johnson Finds Her Calling At CSCC

Thursday, July 12, 2018 - by Holly Vincent
When Michael Johnson started taking classes at Cleveland State, she knew she wanted to pursue a job in the medical field, but she wasn’t sure what type of position. She also knew that she wanted to learn both the clinical and the clerical side. After researching CSCC’s medical assisting program, she decided this was right up her alley because this program teaches both sides of the field. 
 
Although she started the program not knowing anyone, she quickly made a lot of friends. The smaller classes allowed Ms. Johnson the opportunity to get to know her fellow classmates quickly as they were all seeking the same goal.  

“I really loved the size of the class,” said Ms.
Johnson. “It was a smaller group, and we started and finished the program together. We became more than classmates. We celebrated accomplishments and failures together. We were supportive and encouraging to each other.” 

During her time at CSCC, Ms. Johnson was an active member of the Medical Assisting Club on campus, where she enjoyed volunteering for projects that helped the community. The club did collections on campus—food drives, hats for the homeless and they also volunteered at the Ronald McDonald House in Chattanooga. 

“The classes were tough, but rewarding,” stated Ms. Johnson. “I loved that we had a variety of classes, and we were able to do hands-on learning, as well. You didn’t just sit and listen to lectures; you had the opportunity to practice what you were learning.”

Ms. Johnson continued, “Karmon (Kingsley, director of the Medical Assisting Program) is an amazing instructor. She is knowledgeable, organized and caring. She doesn’t just lecture; she teaches you. She helps prepare you for what is on the other side of the program with clear, concise instruction.”

Upon graduation, Ms. Johnson was offered a position as a certified medical assistant (CMA AAMA) at Peerless Pediatrics, where she has been for the past two years. 

“I absolutely love my patients. I am blessed to see these children grow up and become amazing kids. I see kids that were just born when I started at Peerless Pediatrics, and now they come in and they know my name and want to give me hugs. Their little smiles are my favorite part of my day.” 

The mom of two teenage boys said this journey was not without sacrifice. Her sons, Cole and Clay, were very understanding when their mom had to miss some ballgames and other commitments along the way. They saw her have to make choices that showed her determination to finish what she started, and according to Ms. Johnson, those sacrifices were small compared to the lessons they learned while starting and finishing that journey together. She explained to them that this was a temporary situation that would lead to opportunities that would impact her family in a positive way.

“My favorite memory of graduation was walking into the gym that morning and looking up into the crowd and seeing my boys standing and clapping for me. We did it!” 

Ms. Johnson said, “Being in the medical field is a calling; it is not for everyone. I get to live out my calling in life, and I am so blessed for the journey.”

To find out more information about CSCC’s Medical Assisting program, you can attend the upcoming information session on Thursday, July 19 at 6 p.m. in room 302 of the Career Education Building on the CSCC campus. Representatives from the CSCC Medical Assisting program will be available during the sessions to answer questions about entering the program in the fall semester. Anyone interested in working in a clinical setting, physician’s office or ambulatory care is welcome to attend. These sessions are open to the public and not just Cleveland State students. To R.S.V.P. for the Medical Assisting Information Session, visit mycs.cc/medicalassisting16. You can also visit the CSCC website for information on the program at www.clevelandstatecc.edu



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